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2015-2016 Teaching IDEAS Series

Teaching Triangles: Fall 2015 Orientation Meeting
Tuesday, Sept 8, 3:00 - 4:30    Love Auditorium [map]
Dr Hugh Crumley, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

This orientation is for graduate student instructors who are teaching or TAing a class in fall term 2015 and would like to participate in peer teaching observation and feedback. Completion of Teaching Triangles during a semester in which you are an instructor or TA can fulfill the teaching & observation requirement of the Certificate in College Teaching. Note that Teaching Triangles is run every semester; this registration is only for those teaching in fall term, 2015.
Register here.

 

The Tech-Savvy Job Search
Monday, September 14, 12:00 – 1:30        Perkins 217
Dr Hugh Crumley, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use an RSS aggregator to simultaneously collect search results from hundreds of job posting sites, including the Chronicle of Higher Education and many other well-established, reputable sources of academic job postings (it really is much more efficient than getting email alerts.) Bring your laptop. Delicious pizza shall be served to registrants.
Register here.

 

Gender Differences in Academia: 
Challenges and Choices along Career Paths in Higher Education

Tuesday, September 29    12:00-2:00pm   Perkins 217
Dr Rhonda Sutton
President, STEP Notes, Inc.
Owner, InnerSights Counseling and Consultation

Men and women are still treated differently based on gender stereotypes, and higher education is not immune to gender bias.  Whether one is seeking a career as a faculty member or some other type of position within academia, knowing the potential challenges one can experience is important.  This presentation explores some of the possible situations women and men may encounter as well as provide information on current research findings related to the gender divide in college and university settings. Case studies will be shared so as to explore solutions and develop approaches to addressing gender discrimination. Feel free to bring your own lunch and drink. This Teaching Ideas workshop also earns 2 RCR credits.
Register here.

 

The Teaching Statement
Monday, October 5, 12:00 – 1:30        Perkins 217
Dr Hugh Crumley, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

A teaching portfolio is more than a collection of documents: it is set of claims about your teaching and evidence to support them. In this workshop, you will examine how claims and evidence can be framed in way that allows you demonstrate your skill (or potential) as a university instructor in a teaching statement supported by materials created by you (such as videos, handouts and student assignments). Bring your laptop. Delicious pizza shall be served to registrants.
Register here.

 

FLIP a Lesson! Create an Engaging Learning Environment
Monday, October 19, 12:00 – 1:30        Perkins 217
Dr Barbi Honeycutt, Owner, FLIP It Consulting

There are many models and definitions for the flipped classroom. In Dr. Honeycutt’s FLIP model, it means to “Focus on your Learners by Involving them in the Process.” It essentially means reversing the way you design the learning environment so students are engaging in activities, applying concepts, and focusing on higher level learning outcomes during class time. When you flip, you switch from instructor-centered design to participant-centered design which allows you to create a learning environment that is engaging, motivational and productive. This workshop will be flipped to allow participants to experience a flipped learning environment for themselves. We’ll create a plan for a flipped lesson and we’ll explore the current research, models, and best practices for creating a successful learning environment for both the instructor and the students. Participants are encouraged to bring a lesson they’d like to flip.
Register here

 

Winging it with Jaybird: Improv for Teaching
Monday, October 26, 12:00 – 1:30        Brody Theater in Branson Hall [map]
Jaybird O'Berski
Assistant Professor of the Practice of Theater Studies
Artistic Director, The Little Green Pig Theatrical Concern

College teaching requires thinking on your feet and adapting to sometimes fast-moving discussions. In this workshop, you will go through a series of activities and exercises to help your teaching practice benefit from the craft of improvisation and theater. Note that the event is being held in Brody Theater on East Campus.
Register here

 

Francisco RamosDaring to Debate: Strategies for Teaching Controversial Topics in the Classroom
Tuesday, November 3, 12:00 – 1:30        Perkins 217
Dr Francisco Ramos, Manager of Program Assessment

From the protests in Ferguson to the legalization of gay marriage, we are witnessing a time of tremendous social and cultural change. For educators, change often manifests in the classroom with our students and their experiences in everyday life. This workshop illustrates pedagogical strategies and techniques that will help educators design constructive class environments where students can discuss current events. Specifically, this workshop is organized around the following questions: 1) How do we approach, facilitate, and teach contentious issues? 2) How and where do you find reliable information to present to students? 3) What role does social media have in these conversations? With some preparation and facilitation techniques, open discussion of current events can become an extremely rewarding experience for you and your students. Delicious pizza shall be served to registrants.
Register here

Teaching Triangles: Spring 2016 Orientation Meeting

TUesday, Feb 2, 3:00 - 4:30    Love Auditorium, LSRC
Dr. Hugh Crumley, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs
Duke University Graduate School

This orientation is for graduate student instructors who are teaching or TAing a class in spring term 2016 and would like to participate in peer teaching observation and feedback. Completion of Teaching Triangles during a semester in which you are an instructor or TA can fulfill the teaching & observation requirement of the Certificate in College Teaching. Note that Teaching Triangles is run every semester; this registration is only for those teaching in spring term, 2016.
Registration closed.

 

The Teaching Statement & Online Teaching Portfolio

Monday, April 4, 12:00 – 1:30        Perkins 217
Dr Hugh Crumley, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs
Duke University Graduate School

In this workshop, you will examine how to write a teaching statement as a set of claims and how to provide evidence to support them. We will also look at how to develop a this statement & evidence into a professional online presence in form of a teaching portfolio. Bring your laptop. Delicious pizza shall be served to registrants.
REGISTER HERE.

 

Textual Recycling

Tuesday, April 19     3:00 - 5:00     LSRC Love AUditorium
Dr. Cary Moskovitz, Director, Writing in the Disciplines, Thompson Writing Program 

This forum addresses the issue of "textual recycling," which refers to a writer’s reusing excerpts from previously published writing, either verbatim or in a slightly altered form, in a “new” publication without attribution. The practice of textual recycling is more common and accepted than generally acknowledged. In some data-driven fields such as the natural and medical sciences, textual recycling is tacitly expected. In contrast, textual recycling is unacceptable in the humanities, where it is referred to as “self-plagiarism.” Those who practice textual recycling in academic writing have two motivations: convenience and consistency. In contexts where originality of prose is not highly valued, authors have no motivation to rework prose that does its job effectively merely for the purpose of avoiding replication.  Maintaining consistent language from one paper to another stabilizes meaning for readers of multiple papers comprising an ongoing line of research. Examples from different fields are presented to demonstrate the regularity of textual recycling and to show that recycling tends to occur at specific locations such as in the introduction and methods sections of scientific research reports.  Despite its frequent use, textual recycling is routinely ignored in writing guides and textbooks. This talk concludes with comments on pedagogical implications for undergraduate and graduate-level writing instruction. Participation in this event also earns 2 RCR credits.
REGISTER HERE.

 

 

 

Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) Information Session

 

 

Monday, May 2,  1:00 – 3:00    Perkins 217
Panel of current PFF Fellows, moderated by Dr. Hugh Crumley, PFF Director

The Preparing Future Faculty program at Duke provides a yearlong experience for PhD students and postdocs to prepare them for the multiple roles they may be asked to assume as future faculty members in a variety of academic institutions. PFF fellows learn about the broad range of faculty roles and responsibilities by visiting nearby cluster campuses, working closely with a mentor at one of six partner institutions, and attending colloquia at Duke on critical issues in academia. Typically about 25 to 30 PFF fellows are selected annually, including up to five postdoctoral fellows.The program follows the academic calendar, and we expect those selected as fellows to participate fully during the entire academic year. Applications for AY 15-16 will be due June 1, 2016.
REGISTER HERE.