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Spring 2014 Professional Development Series

See the Graduate School’s professional development calendar for a chronological list of the PDS workshops and events, as well as other professional development opportunities sponsored by The Graduate School and the Duke Career Center. More events are added throughout the semester.

Academic Job Search Series

Graduate students and postdocs interested in pursuing careers in academia can learn about opportunities beyond tenure-track positions during the spring semester. You can find topics relevant to all students as well as specialized panels for the humanities and social sciences and sciences and engineering.

This series is offered every two years and is co-sponsored with the Duke Career Center and the Office of Postdoctoral Services.

Visit the Academic Job Search Series web page for complete details.

Science and Engineering Seminars

Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Careers in the Sciences and Engineering
Thursday, Feb 27, 9:00–10:0 a.m., Jones 143
Registration: http://tinyurl.com/STEM-Non-Tenure-Regis

Want to keep doing research in an academic institution, but not sure you want the same kind of career as your tenured or tenure-track PI? What if you love to teach, or are thinking about an administrative career? Our panel will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of non-tenure-track faculty appointments in the sciences and engineering.

Panelists:

Non-Faculty Careers in Academia for Science and Engineering PhDs
Thursday, March 6, 9:00–10:00 a.m., Bryan Research Bldg 103
Registration: http://tinyurl.com/non-faculty-careers

Watch on YouTube

Teaching and academic research aren’t the only career opportunities at colleges and universities. PhDs are employed in departmental administration, proposal development, science education, student affairs, and career services, to name just a few options. If you have a PhD in the sciences or engineering, this panel will provide a wealth of information about academic career paths you may not have considered.

Panelists:

  • Lauren Anderson, PhD, Research Development Associate, School of Medicine Office of Research Development (PhD Neurobiology)
  • Elizabeth Johnson, PhD,  Associate Director, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences (PhD Neural Science)
  • La Tondra Murray, PhD, Associate Director, Professional Masters Programs, Pratt School of Engineering (PhD Industrial Engineering)
  • Jory Weintraub, PhD,  Assistant Director, Science Education and Outreach, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center [NESCent] (PhD Immunology)

Managing a Lab: Insights from Academia and Industry
Thursday, March 13, 9:00–11:00 a.m., Bryan Research Bldg 103
Registration: http://tinyurl.com/ngghaxq

Watch on YouTube

For scientists conducting laboratory-based research, effective lab management can be as crucial to career success as the research itself. In this seminar, Dr. Sally Kornbluth, Vice Dean for Basic Sciences, Duke School of Medicine, will speak on topics ranging from staffing your laboratory to establishing successful research collaborations. Dr. Kornbluth will then be joined by lab managers from academia and industry to answer questions from the audience and compare/contrast experiences.

Panelists:

Note: This workshop provides Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) credit for attendees. Postdoctoral RCR requirements are outlined at http://ors.duke.edu/orsmanual/rcr-postdoctoral-researchers. Graduate student RCR requirements are outlined at http://gradschool.duke.edu/academics/degree_reqs/rcr/index.php.

Humanities and Social Science Seminars

Non-Faculty Careers in Academia for Social Sciences/Humanities PhDs
Wednesday, February 5, 3:30–5:00 p.m., Perkins Library 217, Duke West Campus
Registration: http://bit.ly/Non-Fac_Hum_SS

Watch on YouTube

Teaching and academic research aren’t the only career opportunities at colleges and universities. PhDs are employed in departmental administration, program development, science education, student affairs, tech transfer, career services, and fundraising, to name just a few options.If you have a PhD in the social sciences or humanities, this panel will provide a wealth of information about academic career paths you may not have considered.

Panelists:

  • Margaret Lou Brown, PhD, Senior Research Scholar and Director of Programs, Forum for Publics and Scholars
  • Christian Ferney, PhD,  Student Programs Manager, Kenan Institute for Ethics
  • Alan Kendrick, PhD,  Assistant Dean for Graduate Student Development, Duke Graduate School
  • Heidi Madden, PhD, Librarian for Western European Studies and Adjunct Asst Prof of Germanic Languages & Literature, Duke University Libraries

Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Careers in the Social Sciences and Humanities
Friday, February 28, 2:30–3:45 p.m., Biological Sciences 144
Registration: http://goo.gl/vixL22

Want to keep doing research or teaching in an academic institution, but not sure you want the same kind of career as your tenured or tenure-track PI? Our panel will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of non-tenure-track faculty appointments in the social sciences and humanities.

Panelists:

Seminars for All Graduate Students and Postdocs

The Art of Interviewing
Greg Justice, Associate Professor of Theater Arts, Virginia Tech
Tuesday, February 4, 9:00–11:00 a.m., Jones 143
Registration: http://bit.ly/artofinterviewing

Professor Gregory Justice is an executive coach and offers workshops on teaching and interviewing for future faculty. In this workshop, participants will learn ways to improve communication effectiveness during academic or industry interviews.  Prof. Justice will help you:

  • Clarify the purpose of the job interview
  • Reflect on when and how the interview actually ‘begins’
  • Consider skills utilized to be successful before, during and after an interview
  • Identify how personal fears and nerves impact people during an interview
  • Learn and rehearse skills toward a successful interview from entrance to exit

Developing a Teaching Statement and Online Teaching Portfolio
Hugh Crumley, PhD, Director, Duke Certificate in College Teaching and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education, Duke University
Monday, March 24, 12:00–1:30 p.m., Perkins Library 217, Duke West Campus
Registration: https://duke.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8A1vzaX2AOwDmu1

A teaching portfolio is more than a collection of documents: it is set of claims about your teaching and evidence to support them. In this workshop, you will examine how claims and evidence can be framed in way that allows you demonstrate your skill (or potential) as a university instructor in a teaching statement supported by materials created by you (such as videos, handouts and student assignments).

Core Competencies Series

The Art of Interviewing
Greg Justice, Associate Professor of Theater Arts, Virginia Tech
Tuesday, February 4, 9:00–11:00 a.m., 143 Jones Building
Registration: http://bit.ly/artofinterviewing

Professor Gregory Justice is an executive coach and offers workshops on teaching and interviewing for graduate students and postdocs. In this workshop, participants will learn ways to improve communication effectiveness during academic or industry interviews. Professor Justice will help you:

  • Clarify the purpose of the job interview
  • Reflect on when and how the interview actually “begins”
  • Consider skills utilized to be successful before, during and after an interview
  • Identify how personal fears and nerves impact people during an interview
  • Learn and rehearse skills toward a successful interview from entrance to exit

This workshop is co-sponsored with the Office of Postdoctoral Services and the Duke Career Center and is also part of the Academic Job Search Series.

Enhancing Your Leadership by Understanding Your Personality Type
Shelly Hoover-Plonk, Career Consultant
Monday, February 10, 1:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m., Von Canon Room, Bryan Center
Registration: http://bit.ly/MBTI_Feb_10

Have you ever wondered how your personality shapes the way you interact with other people? Do you prefer quiet time alone or interacting with a lot of people? Do you like to be highly organized or fly by the seat of your pants? This interactive workshop will help you learn not only about your own behaviors and preferences but also how people with different personality types might perceive those behaviors and preferences, impacting your effectiveness as a leader. Using an assessment based on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, this workshop will help you apply your understanding to your interactions with others.

Detailed instructions for the assessment available upon registration; all participants must register and complete the assessment by Thursday, February 6 at 5 p.m. At the workshop, delicious pizza will be served; please bring your own beverage to enjoy.

Navigating the Mentoring Relationship
Rhonda Sutton, LPC, Owner, InnerSights Counseling and Consultation
Tuesday, February 18, 9:00-11:00 a.m., 143 Jones Building
Registration: http://tinyurl.com/qyf9g9w

Ask yourself: do you have a good mentor, or a tor-mentor? Mentoring is critical to the graduate student and the postdoc experience. However, it is not always the easiest relationship to navigate. To succeed, you must understand the culture of the department as well as the communication style of your mentor. This interactive workshop will provide a focus on the typical communication styles of mentoring relationships, as well as the role mentoring has within the Responsible Conduct of Research arena. You will gain tools to build a successful mentoring relationship with your PI or faculty advisor. You will also learn communication strategies and behavioral approaches. This workshop is appropriate for graduate students and postdocs in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and engineering. Co-sponsored with the Office of Postdoctoral Services, this workshop fulfills 2 credits of Responsible Conduct of Research training requirements.

Finding Yourself in the National Archives
David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States
Monday, March 3, 11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m., 217 Perkins Library
Registration: Duke E-Recruiting

Master’s and doctoral students are invited to join this special opportunity to hear from National Archivist David Ferriero. David Ferriero was nominated by President Obama and later confirmed as the 10th Archivist of the United States in 2009. He is the first librarian to become Archivist and lead the National Archives and Record Administration (NARA). Prior to his current role, Mr. Ferriero served as the Director of the New York Public Libraries (2004-2009), and before that he was University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs at Duke University (1996-2004). Duke bestowed Mr. Ferriero with an honorary degree in May 2013. Co-sponsored with Duke Career Center.

Managing a Lab: Insights from Academia & Industry
Thursday, March 13, 9:00–11:00 a.m., 103 Bryan Research Building (Corner of Research Dr. and Coal Pile Dr.)
Registration: http://tinyurl.com/ngghaxq

For scientists conducting laboratory-based research, effective lab management can be as crucial to career success as the research itself. In this seminar, Sally Kornbluth, vice dean for basic sciences at the Duke University School of Medicine, will speak on topics ranging from staffing your laboratory to establishing successful research collaborations. Kornbluth will then be joined by lab managers from academia and industry to answer questions from the audience and compare/contrast experiences.

Panelists:

Co-sponsored with the Office of Postdoctoral Services and the Duke Career Center, this workshop is also part of the Academic Job Search Series and fulfills 2 credits of Responsible Conduct of Research training requirements.

Managing Your Research Career Using an Individual Development Plan (IDP)
Dara Wilson-Grant, Associate Director at the UNC-Chapel Hill Office of Postdoctoral Affairs
Tuesday, March 18, 9:00–11:00 a.m., 143 Jones Building
Registration: http://tinyurl.com/qgm26bp

For better or for worse, your experiences and the training you receive as graduate students and postdoctoral researchers can greatly impact and shape the rest of your career. However, there are strategies and resources that can enhance your chances of getting what you came for. During this program participants will learn how to develop clear and specific goals and objectives, along with a plan for executing them. Topics covered in this RCR module include:

  • The importance of setting goals and developing an IDP
  • Introduction to the SMART goals model
  • Resources for crafting and executing your IDP
  • Strategies for establishing expectations and effectively communicating research and career goals with your mentor/PI

Co-sponsored with the Office of Postdoctoral Services, this workshop fulfills 2 credits of Responsible Conduct of Research training requirements.

The Elevator Pitch
Joy Javits, Founder, In the Public Eye: Effective Communication
Thursday, March 20, 3:00–5:00 p.m., The Graduate School, Room 102
Registration: http://bit.ly/pitch320

The elevator pitch can work as an introduction at networking opportunities and as a great Summary section for your LinkedIn profile. In this workshop, communication expert Joy Javits will help you draft, edit, and practice your elevator pitch. You'll receive feedback on how to sharpen your pitch and establish your professional image. Open only to Graduate School students (doctoral and research master’s).

Detours and Straight Lines: Navigating Evolving Career Goals
Gary Glass, Associate Director for Outreach and Developmental Programming, CAPS
Friday, March 21, 2:30–4:00 p.m., Biological Sciences, Room 144
Registration: http://bit.ly/CAPS_321

Do you remember being an undergraduate, when the possibilities that went along with declaring a major were wide open? As graduate students, the road ahead seems to be more focused and narrow than you could have imagined back then. One of the advantages, now that you're a graduate student, is that your goals are easier to declare because the options seem more narrowly defined. One of the disadvantages is that your goals are easier to declare because the options seem more narrowly defined. This program will introduce some of the commonly experienced (but less commonly discussed) questions of career direction for graduate students. The level of investment often dictates a mindset that doesn't allow you to think about alternative paths. Still, you sometimes feel a pull away from the career path you're on. Using your values, needs, and fears, this workshop will offer a framework to use as you navigate the questions about what your career options can be and the many different forms of commitment your current path can take. Co-sponsored with CAPS.

Dress for Success
Mark Coffey, Store Manager, Brooks Brothers Flatiron Shop, Durham; and Kelly Fishburne, Brooks Brothers Store Manager, Crabtree Valley Mall, Raleigh
Tuesday, March 25, 3:30-4:45 p.m., Perkins Library, Room 217
Registration: http://bit.ly/dress_325

If you've ever wondered the difference between business formal and business casual, how to match a tie to a dress shirt, or whether to choose pants or a skirt for an interview, this presentation is for you! The presenters will bring clothes and examples to demonstrate how to dress for success. Co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

Presenting Yourself Successfully: One-on-One Coaching
Joy Javits, Founder, In the Public Eye: Effective Communication
Thursday, March 27, 1-hour individual appointments, The Graduate School, Room 207
Registration: http://bit.ly/javits0327

Do you have an upcoming conference presentation, challenging conversation, or other situation for which you’d like one-on-one coaching? Communications professional Joy Javits will conduct individual sessions during this time for you to get the practice that you desire. Morning and afternoon appointments are available by registration. Open only to Graduate School students (doctoral and research master’s). Co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

Networking: Building Professional Relationships for Graduate Students
Paul Miceli, Assistant Director, Graduate Student Career Services, Duke Career Center
Thursday, March 27, 10:00–11:30 a.m., Biological Sciences 154
Registration: Duke E-Recruiting

Graduate students frequently report that face-to-face networking feels uncomfortable, inauthentic, or both. Because you will work with others for most of your working life, your ability to build and maintain productive relationships is foundational. In this highly interactive workshop you will learn and practice how to create conversation with people you don't know, learn networking norms and strategies, and identify effective ways to follow up to create and sustain mutually beneficial professional relationships. Sponsored by the Duke Career Center; co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

Thinking On Your Feet (Improvisation Workshop)
Gregory Hohn, Senior Lecturer, Management and Office Communication, Kenan-Flagler Business School, UNC-Chapel Hill
Friday, March 28, 10:00–11:30 a.m., Carr Building, Room 240 (East Campus)
Registration: http://bit.ly/GSAW14ThinkingonyourFeet

Thinking on Your Feet is an experiential, interactive program designed to improve participants’ ability to handle unexpected situations. Using improvisational theater exercises and games, participants will explore ways to improve communication, creativity, and collaboration in unplanned moments. Co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

PhD Career Paths Series

Careers in Finance for Humanities and Social Science PhDs (Versatile PhD Online Panel Discussion)
Monday, January 20 through Friday, January 24, online
Information available: http://vphd.info/1f916nw

Free online panel discussion featuring humanities and social science PhDs currently working in in roles such as investment strategy, proposal writing, analysis and research, client relations, and others. Panelists introduce themselves on Monday and answer your questions until Friday; join in the conversation at any time during the week. Registration at Versatile PhD is free; use your Duke NetID to access premium content like the Career Finder. Co-sponsored with the Duke Career Center.

Careers in Finance for STEM PhDs (Versatile PhD Online Panel Discussion)
Monday, February 10 through Friday, February 14, online
Information available: http://vphd.info/1d6oD11

Free online panel discussion featuring STEM PhDs currently working in finance. Panelists introduce themselves on Monday and answer your questions until Friday; join in the conversation at any time during the week. Registration at Versatile PhD is free; use your Duke NetID to access premium content like the Career Finder. Co-sponsored with the Duke Career Center.

Careers in Social Media for Humanities & Social Science PhDs (Versatile PhD Online Panel Discussion)
Monday, March 10 through Friday, March 14, online

Free online panel discussion featuring PhDs in the humanities and social sciences currently working in social media. Panelists introduce themselves on Monday and answer your questions until Friday; join in the conversation at any time during the week. Registration at Versatile PhD is free; use your Duke NetID to access premium content like the Career Finder. Co-sponsored with the Duke Career Center.

Detours and Straight Lines: Navigating Evolving Career Goals
Gary Glass, Associate Director for Outreach and Developmental Programming, CAPS
Friday, March 21, 2:30–4:00 p.m., Biological Sciences, Room 144
Registration: http://bit.ly/CAPS_321

Do you remember being an undergraduate, when the possibilities that went along with declaring a major were wide open? As graduate students, the road ahead seems to be more focused and narrow than you could have imagined back then. One of the advantages, now that you're a graduate student, is that your goals are easier to declare because the options seem more narrowly defined. One of the disadvantages is that your goals are easier to declare because the options seem more narrowly defined. This program will introduce some of the commonly experienced (but less commonly discussed) questions of career direction for graduate students. The level of investment often dictates a mindset that doesn't allow you to think about alternative paths. Still, you sometimes feel a pull away from the career path you're on. Using your values, needs, and fears, this workshop will offer a framework to use as you navigate the questions about what your career options can be and the many different forms of commitment your current path can take. Co-sponsored with CAPS.

Alumni Lunch: Basic Medical Sciences
Tuesday, March 25, 12:00–1:30 p.m. The Graduate School, Room 102
Registration: http://bit.ly/GSAW14AlumLunchIBasSci

Meet distinguished graduate alumni in an informal lunch setting. Confirmed guests include:

  • Steve Greenbaum, Vice President, BAI, Inc. and Managing Partner, Sciversify (Ph.D., Immunology)
  • David McDonald, Postdoctoral Fellow at North Carolina Central University (Ph.D, Genetics and Genomics)

Co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

Alumni Lunch: Humanities and Social Sciences
Wednesday, March 26, 12:00–1:30 p.m., The Graduate School, Room 102
Registration: http://bit.ly/GSAW14AlumlunchHumSS

Meet distinguished graduate alumni in an informal lunch setting. Confirmed guests include:

  • Richard L. Collier, Archivist, Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, Rubenstein Library, and Instructor, Cultural Anthropology (Ph.D., Cultural Anthropology)
  • Marianne Wardle, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Academic Programs, Nasher Museum of Art (Ph.D., Art History)
  • Timothy Young, Assistant Director, Development & Alumni Relations, Sanford School of Public Policy (M.A., Liberal Studies)

Co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

Humanities and Social Sciences Postdoc Panel Discussion: “What to Know Before You Go”
Wednesday, March 26, 3:00–4:00 p.m., Perkins Library, Room 217
Registration: http://bit.ly/GSAW14HumSSPostdocPanel

Graduate students navigating career paths face many challenges as they seek postdoctoral work, fellowships, or both. This humanities and social sciences panel will address many career-related concerns facing graduate students in related disciplines. Confirmed panelists include:

  • Guy Hochman, Research Fellow, Fuqua School of Business
  • Martha Kenney, Postdoctoral Associate, Women’s Studies
  • SaunJuhi Verma, Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellow, Sociology

Co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

Alumni Lunch: Engineering and Natural Sciences
Thursday, March 27, 12:00–1:30 p.m., The Graduate School, Room 102
Registration: http://bit.ly/GSAW14AlumlunchIIIEngNatSci

Meet distinguished graduate alumni from engineering and natural sciences in an informal lunch setting. Confirmed guests include:

  • Robert Schutte, Process Development Manager, Humacyte (PhD, Biomedical Engineering)
  • Charles S. (Steve) Wallace, Jr., Instructor, Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering (PhD, Biomedical Engineering)

Co-sponsored with Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

A Humanities PhD's Career Path in Museums and Art
Valerie Hillings, Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Thursday, April 17, 1:00–2:00 p.m., Friedl 225
Registration: http://bit.ly/Hillingschat

Hillings joined the curatorial staff of the Guggenheim Foundation in 2004, and since that time she has curated and cocurated exhibitions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Deutsche Guggenheim, and the Guggenheim Hermitage Museum. She is currently part of the curatorial team developing exhibits and a permanent collection for the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. She has published and lectured on curatorial practice and post-World War II art; she served on the jury for the Kandinsky Prize for Russian contemporary art from 2007-2009, and she currently serves on the ZERO Foundation Scientific Board. Join Hillings to learn how she launched her art and museum career through her PhD in Art History in an informal conversation over coffee and tea. Find more details about Hillings’ visit to campus on April 16 and 17 on the Duke Colloquium website.